It wasn’t too long ago that most government agencies used a simple strategy to keep citizens compliant with things like paying taxes, appearing for jury duty or maintaining licenses: remind them of the consequences they could incur if they didn’t comply. The assumption was that people would make rational decisions on cost-benefit grounds and would act out of self-interest. Why wouldn’t they? It’s how we imagined we’d behave ourselves, and it’s how we designed our policies and strategies. More...

For many years, one of the biggest challenges faced in tax administration was figuring out how to capture the data needed to effectively assess and collect taxes owed to the government. Over the last 25 years, the advent of electronic filing, advances in data capture technology, and the growth of data sources have replaced this problem with a new one: How to effectively use the now abundant amount of data available to solve business problems. More...

Ten years ago, I had three devices connected to my home Internet, used intermittently, allowing my family and me to be more efficient, flexible, informed, and entertained. Now, I have 33 devices, collectively connected to the Internet, 24x7. Along with increases in connected devices, we’ve seen an exponential surge in the flow of data. Also growing at the same time is the need to store, secure, access and analyze this data. More...

Pages